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Moquette availability

Click on a tile to find out more information about each fabric

  • Barman
  • Central
  • Chevron - Enid Marx 1938
  • District - Misha Black 1978
  • Double Diamond - Enid Marx c1937
  • Green Line
  • Midland Red Leopard Print
  • Metropolitan Diamond
  • New Leaf - Michelle Mason
  • Old Metropolitan
  • Overground Priority - Wallace Sewell 2007
  • Overground Standard - Wallace Sewell 2007
  • Routemaster - Douglas Scott
  • RT/RF
  • S-Stock
  • Straub
  • Victoria Line
  • New Routemaster
  • Café - Misha Black 1978
  • Cracked Ice
  • District Refurbished
  • Old Circle
  • Piccadilly
  • Piccadilly Plain
  • Sea Shell
  • Tramlink Priority
  • Tramlink Standard
  • Digital Pink
  • East London Transit
  • Eastern Coach Works – Check
  • Eastern Coach Works – Floral
  • Eastern Coach Works – Forest
  • Eastern Coach Works – Heathland
  • Graffiti
Barman

Barman

Availability : Good

The fabric, in red and blue, was created by design firm Wallace Sewell and depicts iconic structures through circles, triangles and squares. Known as moquette, it will first be used on refurbished Central Line trains from 2011, and other new trains. The pattern has been named Barman after Christian Barman who commissioned the first moquettes for the Tube in 1936. Mr Barman, who was the Royal Designer for Industry and London Transport's publicity manager between 1935 and 1941, was one of the first people to think about developing a brand for seat patterns.

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Central

Central

Availability : Good

Known as Central line check, this design comprises a geometric grid pattern of contrasting squares, lines and triangles in red and grey on a navy background. The moquette was designed by Jonathan Sothcott specifically for use on the 1992 Central line Tube stock. The colours used complement those used throughout the carriage. It was also one of the first examples of the upholstery pattern picking up the colours of the line. This sample was manufactured by John Holdsworth & Co Limited.

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Chevron - Enid Marx 1938

Chevron - Enid Marx 1938

Availability : Good

This moquette design is a geometric pattern consisting of a light green grid overlaid by diagonal red stripes and checks in the form of a 'chevron', on a dark green background. This moquette was used to re-upholster seats on 1938 Surface Stock trains. On vehicles for the Piccadilly and Central lines it was teamed with red leather arm rests.

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District - Misha Black 1978

District - Misha Black 1978

Availability : Good

This brightly coloured geometric fabric is reputedly designed by the Design Research Unit in the late 1970’s for use in a new fleet of trains then about to be introduced on the District Line (D78 stock). The fabric design was also used on most new buses entering service in London, notably the large fleets of Metrobus and Titan types as well as new trains purchased for use on the Jubilee Line (1983 stock). Four colours were used in the moquette design: orange, yellow, brown and black which complemented brighter bus and train interiors which gave London’s buses and trains a distinctive identity in the 1980’s and became a subconscious icon of the city for 1980’s residents and visitors.

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Double Diamond - Enid Marx

Double Diamond - Enid Marx c1937

Availability : Good

Another pattern in greens and reds used in the late 1930’s and 1940’s. Officially called ‘Brent’.

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Green Line

Green Line

Availability : Good

After World War II, London Transport’s bus and coach fleet was out-dated and rather careworn after nearly 6 years of continuous conflict and the rigours of wartime service. A new fleet of coaches were ordered for London Transport’s Green Line coach services and a small fleet of Private Hire coaches were also ordered to run tours to and from the Festival of Britain at London’s South Bank in 1951. A new and very elegant moquette was commissioned for use on all London Transport’s coaches and remained in use for several years. The pattern was recently rediscovered and has been faithfully reproduced to the exact original specification.

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Midland Red Leopard Print

Midland Red Leopard Print

Availability : Good

In 1959, Britain’s first main Motorway opened between serving London and Birmingham. Midland Red, the bus and coach company serving huge areas of central England, (and based in Birmingham), designed and built a special fleet of coaches for use on the first dedicated express service to the use the new motorway. The coaches had a distinctly American design and used leopard print for the first time as seating fabric. At the time, the design of the coaches and their interiors was considered revolutionary. London Transport Museum has recreated the fabric for use on a wide range of applications.

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Metropolitan Diamond

Metropolitan Diamond

Availability : Good

The Metropolitan line A stock trains which were in service from 1961 to 2012 featured a number of moquette designs through the trains’ lifetime. This fabric design was used in the early 1990’s to replace the original moquette design used when the trains first entered service. This bold pattern uses as its base the Metropolitan line’s distinctive magenta colour. The trains themselves were considered the flagship of London Underground’s fleet, having ample high back comfortable seating, luggage racks and a higher top speed than any other Underground train. The A stock trains served the distant Chiltern towns of Amersham and Chesham, so their comfortable seats and elegant moquette was appreciated by countless thousands of travellers during their 41 years of service.

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New leaf

New Leaf - Michelle Mason

Availability : Good

The bright bold design of New Leaf was created by Michelle Mason taking inspiration from the design of a classic Moquette fabric (the hardwearing fabric used on London Transport seating). She based her design around the legendary 1930s Colindale Moquette by Marion Dorn, an Art Deco stylised leaf design that was used from 1938 on Tube stock Underground trains.
Please note, this is high quality, heavy duty 100% cotton fabric, NOT moquette.

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Old Metropolitan

Old Metropolitan

Availability : Good

The A Stock trains were specially designed for use on the Metropolitan line and featured high back seats, luggage racks and originally operated with a top speed of 70mph to serve towns somewhat distant from central London. These trains are now withdrawn from public service, but when they were refurbished in the mid 1990’s they were upholstered in this striking triangle pattern with the purple Metropolitan line colour predominating.

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Overground Priority - Wallace Sewell 2007

Overground Priority - Wallace Sewell 2007

Availability : Good

London Overground, a division of Transport for London (TfL) was created in 2007 to take over the operation of the North London group of London suburban railway lines, and to oversee the rebuild, extention and re-opening of the East London line, formerly part of London Underground. A new moquette was designed by Wallace Sewell, noted fabric designers, for use on all new trains used on the Overground. The material has been designed in two forms, and this version is used on priority seating on the new fleet of trains due to start service in 2010. This version is designed to highlight priority seating for those less able to stand.

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Overground Standard - Wallace Sewell 2007

Overground Standard - Wallace Sewell 2007

Availability : Good

London Overground, a division of Transport for London (TfL) was created in 2007 to take over the operation of the North London group of London suburban railway lines, and to oversee the rebuild, extention and re-opening of the East London line, formerly part of London Underground. A new moquette was designed by Wallace Sewell, noted fabric designers, for use on all new trains used on the Overground. The material has been designed in two forms, and this version is used on standard seating on the new fleet of trains due to start service in 2010. Orange is the colour identifying Overground.

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Routemaster - Douglas Scott

Routemaster - Douglas Scott

Availability : Good

The tartan style fabric was designed by industrial designer Douglas Scott, who was responsible for the interior and exterior styling of the Routemaster bus. The pattern features horizontal bands of maroon, brown and light green pile interspersed with vertical lines of yellow loop pile. It was designed specifically to echo the interior colour scheme of the vehicle: yellow ceilings, red lower sides and green seat backs.

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RT/RF

RT/RF

Availability : Good

This moquette design was produced for post-war RT-type buses and was developed from a similar pattern which had been designed for the first batch of RTs delivered between 1939 and 1942. The colours are probably derived from the shades found in the functional interior décor of the RT-type, which has evolved from other bus types such as the ST and STL-types as finished in the late 1930s. As the RT fleet became the largest standardised bus type in the world, RT moquette, as it is now generally known, was produced in large quantities and was also specified for other contemporary buses such as the RF and GS-type single deckers. Other types of bus were trimmed with this moquette and even some of the trolleybus fleet, in its latter days, was trimmed with RT moquette.

When its use eventually declined, with the replacement of the 1950s-built buses, surplus moquette was sold for use elsewhere and some was used to re-trim electric multiple unit suburban stock on the Southern Region of British Railways.

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S-Stock

S-Stock

Availability : Good

A large fleet of new trains were ordered for replacement of all sub surface trains on the Metropolitan, Circle, District and Hammersmith lines of London Underground. The S stock has now entered service and a new moquette was designed featuring block colours of the lines served.

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Straub

Straub

Availability : Good

The standard moquette of the 1970’s was applied to all new buses and trains entering service from 1969 until 1978. Designed by Marianne Straub, the design was also used, and variations commissioned, by British Rail for many carriages in their fleet in the 1970’s.

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Victoria Line

Victoria Line

Availability : Good

A new fleet of underground trains have now entered service to replace the trains that were bought by London Transport to launch the new Victoria line in 1967. One of the aspects of the interior design is a new moquette for seating. The Victoria line blue features on the new design.

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New Routemaster

New Routemaster

Availability : Good

The New Routemaster (formerly known as the New Bus for London) was designed by bus builders Wright Bros with considerable design input from Thomas Heatherwick Studio. Amongst the Heatherwick Studio designs incorporated in this iconic bus design is a series of new seating fabrics (moquettes) which were inspired by the elegant material used on the original Routemaster bus which entered service on London streets from 1959. The design we have chosen for use on made to order cushions and furniture is this simple check pattern in grey and deep red with white outlining. The other two designs of fabric used on the new Routemaster are specially designed to suit the shape of some of the seats and regrettably is not suitable for any other furniture applications.

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Café - Misha Black 1978

Café - Misha Black 1978 Recoloured in 2005 for the London Transport Museum

Availability : Limited

The 1979 orange, yellow, brown and black geometric moquette design has been so popular with museum visitors as a subconscious icon of London that the opportunity was taken to revive the design with alternative colourways for use in the rebuilt London Transport Museum which opened in late 2007. The Museum was keen to introduce a version of the timeless moquette design for use in its stylish new Café Bar. A new colour combination of red and three shades of green were chosen to express the tranquillity of the space and the freshness of the café menu.

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Cracked Ice

Cracked Ice

Availability : Limited

This is a moquette design available for use throughout the bus, coach and railway industry for seat coverings. London Transport Museum likes this design, and although not in use in London, represents an interesting fabric design appropriate for use in the home. The random design on the black base is in two shades of grey varying in tone and intensity which is sophisticated and chic.

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District Refurbished

District Refurbished

Availability : Limited

The D stock Underground train fleet purchased in 1980/1 for use on the District Line was originally upholstered in the classic ‘District’ moquette designed by Sir Micha Black. When fabric replacement became due in the mid 1990’s, this design of moquette was chosen. This moquette design was relatively short lived as the fleet was refurbished in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s with a new blue and green fabric which continues to be used in 2014.

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Old Circle

Old Circle

Availability : Limited

The fleet of C69 & C77 stock which currently work the Hammersmith & City, Circle and Edgware were refurbished in the early 1990’s and a new moquette was selected for application to the entire fleet, featuring random patterns in the colours of the lines served.

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Piccadilly

Piccadilly

Availability : Limited

This is the 1997 seating refurbishment of the 1973 Piccadilly line train.

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Piccadilly Plain

Piccadilly Plain

Availability : Limited

Unusually, London Underground used a plain moquette fabric for some seating on Piccadilly line trains when supplies of the standard Piccadilly line moquette design were temporarily unavailable. This colour was from the manufacturers general stock catalogue. When normal supply of the standard moquette resumed, this plain design was quickly replaced.

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Sea Shell

Sea Shell

Availability : Limited

This is a moquette design available for use throughout the bus, coach and railway industry for seat coverings. London Transport Museum likes this design, and although not in use in London, represents an interesting fabric design appropriate for use in the home.

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Tramlink Priority

Tramlink Priority

Availability : Limited

As for Tramlink, but this version is intended to differentiate seats intended for those less able to stand.

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Tramlink Standard

Tramlink Standard

Availability : Limited

Tramlink, a division of Transport for London (TfL) was created in 2007 to take over the operation of Croydon Tramlink which opened in 1999. To coincide with Transport for London’s ownership, a new identity was launched and a programme of improvements to trams and tram stops was developed. As part of the upgrade of tram interiors, a new moquette was designed by leading fabric designers, Wallace Sewell, for use on trams. The material has been designed in two forms, and this version is used on standard seating on trams. The bright green used within the design is the key colour of the tram system.

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Digital Pink

Digital Pink

Availability : Strictly limited

In 2012 London terrestrial television service was changed from Analogue to Digital as part of the nationwide changeover. To help publicise the huge impact of the changes for Londoners, a special advertising livery was devised for a train on the Central line, and unusually, a special moquette was commissioned with blocks of black text on a shocking pink ground. The design of the moquette meant that there were many areas of plain pink that could be recovered for further use (the black advertising text areas having being disposed of), but due to the limited size of remaining panels, the design is only available on cushions, cubes and footstools. A further point of note is that the pink moquette has a black under-weave to further enhance the sharpness of colour.
Please note, the largest item available in this moquette is the Harlem cube

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East London Transit

East London Transit

Availability : Strictly limited

As part of the planned enhancement of a series of East London bus routes, which were conceived to enhance key transport corridors associated with the East London Gateway Project, new buses in a revised London red bus livery were introduced in 2010, together with a special moquette designed to enhance the internal ambience of the bus fleet.

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Eastern Coach Works – Check

Eastern Coach Works – Check

Availability : Strictly limited

Eastern Coach Works were a major builder of bus and coach bodies based in Lowestoft in Suffolk. The majority of buses and coaches built were supplied to the Tilling Group of companies (and after nationalisation of this Group in 1948), to the Transport Holding Company. A number of moquette stock designs were commissioned by Eastern Coach Works in the late 1930’s and a few have been made available to the Museum by bus restoration experts, who have re-commissioned production of these original designs.

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Eastern Coach Works – Floral

Eastern Coach Works – Floral

Availability : Strictly limited

Eastern Coach Works were a major builder of bus and coach bodies based in Lowestoft in Suffolk. The majority of buses and coaches built were supplied to the Tilling Group of companies (and after nationalisation of this Group in 1948), to the Transport Holding Company. A number of moquette stock designs were commissioned by Eastern Coach Works in the late 1930’s and a few have been made available to the Museum by bus restoration experts, who have re-commissioned production of these original designs.

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Eastern Coach Works – Forest

Eastern Coach Works – Forest

Availability : Strictly limited

Eastern Coach Works were a major builder of bus and coach bodies based in Lowestoft in Suffolk. The majority of buses and coaches built were supplied to the Tilling Group of companies (and after nationalisation of this Group in 1948), to the Transport Holding Company. A number of moquette stock designs were commissioned by Eastern Coach Works in the late 1930’s and a few have been made available to the Museum by bus restoration experts, who have re-commissioned production of these original designs.

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Eastern Coach Works – Heathland

Eastern Coach Works – Heathland

Availability : Strictly limited

Eastern Coach Works were a major builder of bus and coach bodies based in Lowestoft in Suffolk. The majority of buses and coaches built were supplied to the Tilling Group of companies (and after nationalisation of this Group in 1948), to the Transport Holding Company. A number of moquette stock designs were commissioned by Eastern Coach Works in the late 1930’s and a few have been made available to the Museum by bus restoration experts, who have re-commissioned production of these original designs.

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Graffiti

Graffiti

Availability : Strictly limited

This design of moquette was commissioned by Leaside, a division of London Transport Buses created prior to privatisation in the mid 1990’s. The design chosen was used on its coach and private hire fleet and the busy pattern was intended to deter damage by graffiti artists.

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